IDL-BNC @ IDRC >
IDRC / CRDI >
IDRC Research Results / Résultats de recherches du CRDI >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10625/50207

Title: Training Clinicians in Cultural Psychiatry: A Canadian Perspective
Authors: Kirmayer, L J
Rousseau, C
Guzder, J
Jarvis, G E
Keywords: CULTURAL DIVERSITY
ETHNIC GROUP
INTERNSHIP AND RESIDENCY
REFUGEES
SOCIAL ENVIROMENT
CULTURAL PSYCHIATRY
MEDICAL RESIDENCES
INTERPRETER
Issue Date: 2008
Citation: Kirmayer, L. J., Rousseau, C., Guzder, J., & Jarvis, G. E. (2008). Training Clinicians in Cultural Psychiatry: A Canadian Perspective. Academic Psychiatry, 32: 313-319.
Abstract: The authors summarize the pedagogical approaches and curriculum used in the training of clinicians in cultural psychiatry at the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, McGill University. We reviewed available published and unpublished reports on the history and development of training in cultural psychiatry at McGill to identify the main orientations, teaching methods, curriculum, and course content. Student evaluations of teaching were reviewed. The training strategies and curriculum are related to the larger social context of Canadian society including the history of migration, current demography, and policies of multiculturalism. The McGill program includes core teaching, clinical rotations, an intensive summer program, and annual Advanced Study Institutes. The interdisciplinary training setting emphasizes general knowledge rather than specific ethnocultural groups, including: understanding the cultural assumptions implicit in psychiatric theory and practice; exploring the clinician’s personal and professional identity and social position; evidence-based conceptual frameworks for understanding the interaction of culture and psychopathology; learning to use an expanded version of the cultural formulation in DSM-IV for diagnostic assessment and treatment planning; and developing skills for working with interpreters and culture-brokers, who mediate and interpret the cultural meaning and assumptions of patient and clinician. An approach to cultural psychiatry grounded in basic social science perspectives and in trainees’ appreciation of their own background can prepare clinicians to respond effectively to the changing configurations of culture, ethnicity, and identity in contemporary health care settings.Abstract Teaser
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10625/50207
ISSN: 1042-9670
1545-7230
Project Number: 103460
Project Title: Teasdale-Corti Global Health Research Partnership
Document Delivery: This document is not available in the IDRC Digital Library / Ce document n'est pas disponible dans la Bibliothèque numérique du CRDI
Appears in Collections:IDRC Research Results / Résultats de recherches du CRDI
2000-2009 / Années 2000-2009
Research Results (GHRI) / Résultats de recherches (IRSM)
Teasdale-Corti Global Health Research Partnership (TC) / partenariat Teasdale-Corti de recherche en santé mondiale

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.

Request this document

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback