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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10625/1579

Title: Dairy industry in Sri Lanka : problems and prospects
Authors: Nelson, Lloyd George
Keywords: DAIRY INDUSTRY
SRI LANKA
TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE
MILK PROCESSING
DAIRY PRODUCTS
MARKETING
HISTORY
CATTLE PRODUCTION
SOCIAL ASPECTS
ECONOMIC ASPECTS
POLITICAL ASPECTS
AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL
ARID ZONE
HUMID ZONE
GRASSLANDS
ANIMAL BREEDING
CROP DIVERSIFICATION
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION
LAND REFORM
Issue Date: Apr-1976
Publisher: University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, CA
Abstract: Sri Lanka has appreciable resources of both bovines and land that could be better utilized for dairy production through the application of scientific methods and carefully planned programmes of livestock development. Until very recently animal husbandry has been the neglected 'stepchild' of agriculture receiving little of the attention given to crop production, particularly paddy cultivation. Though several modern milk processing plants have been established, dairy farming is still largely an unsystematic activity carried out in an unhygienic manner. Domestic milk production is insufficient to meet the consumption demands of a rapidly increasing population. Imports of dairy products continue to deplete scarce foreign exchange earnings required for economic development. This factor coupled with other considerations such as the need to improve nutritional levels among the people and the need to intensify agricultural productivity without the use of expensive artificial fertilizers has stimulated an interest in the development of animal husbandry. The government is now giving unprecedented emphasis to dairying as a more dynamic and integrated sector of the rural economy. But, there are still many problems to be resolved in realizing the obvious potential. Diseases and the rigours of a tropical environment present a constant challenge in attempting to improve poor quality indigenous livestock and native pastures. The physical problems are often complex and little understood; they may be interwoven with and further complicated by the cultural setting. Some of the more important cultural and socio-economic features which affect the pace of dairy development include the following: the constraints of traditional customs of the local peasant farmers, the inadequacy of credit and marketing facilities, a lack of confidence among potential entrepreneurs in resuscitating a near stagnant agro-economic sector, and above all the failure of government extension services to involve livestock owners in development programmes. New initiatives supported by foreign technical and financial assistance may lead to the solution of many of these problems. This would have important ramifications for rural development and the quality of life in Sri Lanka.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10625/1579
Document Delivery: This document is not available in the IDRC Digital Library / Ce document n'est pas disponible dans la Bibliothèque numérique du CRDI
Appears in Collections:IDRC Research Results / Résultats de recherches du CRDI
1970s / Années 1970

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